ProjectCenter

www.MakePaperEasy.com

Advertisement

Archive for December, 2007

ProjectCenter recently bidded on a project that included a request for 1500 units of one-sided color flyers (4/0, if you like). The prospect had stated that they just wanted them to be copier quality, which suggested that they were trying to save money. In this situation, the client would be better off taking the flyers to an offset press. To exemplify the difference in cost, these options were quoted to the client (pricing not exact):

Offset: 2500 units (some offset presses will only allow certain quantities, such as 1000, 2500, 5000, etc.)- $400

Copier: 1500 units (ProjectCenter has a .45 per color copy special for January)- $700

As one can see, not only is there a major price difference, but a client can get more units and the paper stock is much better (offset offers 100lb Gloss Book vs. copy paper).

The only drawbacks in this situation are time and quantity limits. Offset presses can take anywhere from 3-7 days to process, while copy work can typically be done the same day, and as stated above, a lot of offset press printers will only allow certain tiers in ordered quantities.

Check us out at www.makepapereasy.com.

It should be stated that almost all shirt companies will charge more for shirts that are less than Small, more than Extra Large (XL) in mens shirts, and less than Extra Small (XS), more than Extra Large (XL) in womens shirts.

Check us out at www.makepapereasy.com.

As a general ‘rule of thumb’, embroiderers recommend that any text on a stitched piece be at least 3/16 of an inch in height. 3/16″ is the smallest size that will allow verbiage to be clearly visible on any type of apparel or promotional item.

Check us out at www.makepapereasy.com.

Some folks are in search of folders that have the reenforced edges, where the sides are scored, folded and glued. This doubles the material  resulting in a sturdier product.

There is a cost associated to this process. First, unless the die-cutter already has a premade die, there will be a charge to create a custom die. Next, this process requires what a die-cutter calls “handwork”. Handwork refers to manual labor, where a person needs to guide and/or fully process the job, rather than a machine doing it unattended.

Check us out at www.makepapereasy.com.

Learning how to use color correctly and accurately is paramount in the print and design industry. What you see on screen does not always represent what will be produced on a print press. A lot of time and resources can be waisted when color is not done properly. Below is a quick guideline for preparing color correctly and accurately for print:

The first step is to calibrate your monitor to ensure the closest representation to the printed color. While calibration tools can be expensive, there are many online techniques to achieving an accurate monitor calibration, a good starting point would be Adobe Gamma which comes with Adobe Photoshop,  if you do not have access to Adobe Photoshop, try using an online monitor calibrator.

Once you have successfully calibrated your monitor, the next step would be to determine a color scheme that will work for your project. There are several publications that can assist in determining the right color for your needs. The most popular of which are part of the Pantone Color Resources series titled COLOR: messages and meanings. There are also online color generators that will aid in the choosing of a color scheme, (this is not a swatch color picker, it is simply a basic tool for getting started in determining a color scheme).

Finally, you would need to determine how many colors will be used. If you are working with line art/vector graphics (consists of solid shapes and colors), typically choosing a Pantone color swatch saves money and ensures color accuracy, you can purchase a swatch book from Pantone or request samples from your printer, keep in mind the number of colors used will determine the number of plates used on the press so for cost reduction you would want to keep your colors limited. If you are working with projects that include photographs or images with continuous tones, the most cost effective setup would be CMYK. CMYK is a color process/model involving 4 plates; Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black. Since your monitor produces RGB values most programs will default to this color model, so when preparing artwork for print, you should always create or convert your artwork accordingly.

This is a very quick and basic guide for preparing color correctly. It’s always best to consult with your Project Center representative first before submitting any artwork.

ABOUT PROJECTCENTER:

ProjectCenter is a single-source service company providing marketing and document solutions to small, medium and large-sized businesses in the U.S. area. ProjectCenter is based in Phoenix, Arizona and its services include graphic design, web design, printing, copying, scanning and mailing. For more information, please call (602) 252-6655 or visit  www.makepapereasy.com.

It important to note that providers will often charge the same price for quantities of 1000 or less. As an example, 250 business cards could very well cost the same as 1000 business cards.

There is a cost associated to setting up the printers for each project, and that charge does not always melt into the overall cost until the project reaches 1000 units.

Check us out at www.makepapereasy.com.

In the digital printing process, there is no bleed charge per side. Generally speaking, this is due to the fact that there isn’t as much manual labor involved with digital printing, as opposed to offset printing.

ABOUT PROJECTCENTER:

ProjectCenter is a single-source service company providing marketing and document solutions to small, medium and large-sized businesses in the U.S. area. ProjectCenter is based in Phoenix, Arizona and its services include graphic design, web design, printing, copying, scanning and mailing. For more information, please call (602) 252-6655 or visit  www.makepapereasy.com.

Once in awhile, a client will create artwork that incorporates a color they call copper. Unfortunately, copper is simply not a color and it cannot even come close to resembling the real thing, which is a material.

When an art piece is printed with copper, clients will often be disappointed in the end result-  the copper color looking more like a brown color. The only true way of accomplishing a copper color on a printed piece is to incorporate foiling services. Foil is just as one would imagine- a foil material that is pressed on to a printed piece of work.

The likelihood that someone would use foil for something like a newsletter is very slim, because it can be an expensive service. Foiling is usually used for business cards, since they are smaller in size and foil sticks better to cardstock.

Check us out at www.makepapereasy.com.