ProjectCenter

www.MakePaperEasy.com

Advertisement

Posts Tagged ‘ digital printing ’

We now offer Green alternatives for your printing. We use recycled papers, soy/vegetable inks and Zero VOC solvents in order to reduce pollution and improve employee safety. Let us know if you want to go green!

Go Green

ABOUT PROJECTCENTER:

ProjectCenter is a single-source service company providing marketing and document solutions to small, medium and large-sized businesses in the U.S. area. ProjectCenter is based in Phoenix, Arizona and its services include graphic design, web design, printing, copying, scanning and mailing. For more information, please call (602) 252-6655 or visit www.makepapereasy.com or follow us at http://twitter.com/ProjectCenter.

ProjectCenter’s Facebook Page
ProjectCenter's Facebook Page
Promote Your Page Too

Book, Text and Cover are names referring to the kind of paper used in a printing job. Most commonly, you’ll hear terms like ‘100lb Gloss Book’, ’80lb Gloss Text’ or ‘130lb Gloss Cover’.

Text and Book are essentially the same paper. It depends on who you talk to. This type of paper stock is typically used for brochures, flyers and posters, which has the thickness of a regular piece of paper, generally speaking.

Cover is a thicker paper stock that verges on the thickness of cardstock. Cover, as its name would suggest, can be used for the outside cover of pamphlets and booklets, as well as postcards and business cards.

 

ABOUT PROJECTCENTER:

ProjectCenter is a single-source service company providing marketing and document solutions to small, medium and large-sized businesses in the U.S. area. ProjectCenter is based in Phoenix, Arizona and its services include graphic design, web design, printing, copying, scanning and mailing. For more information, please call (602) 252-6655 or visit www.makepapereasy.com.

In continuing the concepts of digital printing and offset printing, from our last article at http://www.makepapereasy.com/blog/digital-printing-vs-offset-printing, we found a more recent blog post at PrintCEO discussing the market-share of both technologies:

http://printceoblog.com/2008/11/digital-offset-cross-over

 

ABOUT PROJECTCENTER:

ProjectCenter is a single-source service company providing marketing and document solutions to small, medium and large-sized businesses in the U.S. area. ProjectCenter is based in Phoenix, Arizona and its services include graphic design, web design, printing, copying, scanning and mailing. For more information, please call (602) 252-6655 or visit www.makepapereasy.com.

This is really a classic issue that happens in any sales environment, so I felt the need to share it:

A client made a request for 1000 flyers, specifically sighting quality as their main motive. They wanted sales slicks that would represent them at a well-known trade show, so they wanted magazine quality work. The price quoted was around $200, to which they replied they wanted to see the price of a job quoted on a copier, which immediately contradicted their quality motive. 

The price for the copier job turned out to be around $300. What??? The client couldn’t understand why the something of lower quality would be higher in price. We explained that while copier prices remain the same price per unit, the offset printing price per unit goes down as the quantity goes up. Not believing us, the client then bid us out on the job, only to find out that we were right on target.

Two weeks later, due to them waiting for their “cheap” graphic designer to complete the artwork, they came back asking for 100 units of the flyers. The price for printing was around $100, and the price for copy work was around $50. Again, the client was dismayed. “Why is the copy price lower than the print price this time?”. We had to reiterate that the price per unit for printing goes down as the quantity goes up, which would suggest that the price per unit goes up when the quantity goes down.

So the client wanted to see a sample of the copy work, but they were not satisfied with the quality. At the same time, they did not want to pay $40 more for the offset printing quality. 

We asked them, out of curiousity, what they paid their graphic designer for the artwork, and they said $150. We told them we could have gotten that artwork done for them in one hour, and we charge around $70-$80 per hour. The math: $150 – $80 = $70 saved. That savings would have nearly paid for their print job.

ABOUT PROJECTCENTER:

ProjectCenter is a single-source service company providing marketing and document solutions to small, medium and large-sized businesses in the U.S. area. ProjectCenter is based in Phoenix, Arizona and its services include graphic design, web design, printing, copying, scanning and mailing. For more information, please call (602) 252-6655 or visit www.makepapereasy.com.

RGB is for viewing and CMYK is for printing.

Color Modes and When to Use Them:

Bitmap: 1-bit color. Pixels are either black or white. Good for simple line art with no shades of gray, no fuzzy edges. If you are saving to EPS format, remember to check for “Transparent Whites” if you want the black areas to be solid but the background to be “clear.” Be VERY careful messing with the Halftone Screens. If you want a cool T-shirt, silk screen effect, go for it, otherwise be prepared to see you work mangled beyond belief. To make this format more workable, you can convert it to Grayscale (then to duotone, or CMYK or RGB, etc.). If you have something in another format you have to convert it to Grayscale first, then Bitmap will become an option. Bitmaps are good for line art, doesn’t always need trapping, and can be colorized in programs like PageMaker into solid inks.

Grayscale: 8-bit color. Pixels can be black, white, or any one of 256 shades of gray. Good for black and white photos and illustrations. Full color images can easily be converted to grayscale for publication. (But if you want to see a full color–CMYK or RGB image as a grayscale, without actually converting it.

 

Check out ProjectCenter at www.makepapereasy.com, or call us at 602-252-6655.

In the printing world “Four Color” is FULL color. The four colors are the primary colors used to “mix” thousands of other colors in the spectrum. Imagine your old box of crayons: Red, Yellow, Blue, Black and White. With the first three you could mix Orange, Green and Purple. By adding Black you could darken any shade. By adding White you could lighten any tint. By mixing a primary (like Red) with its complimentary secondary (Green) you could get a Brown.

In printing, instead of crayons, we have Cyan (a light blue) Magenta (a cool red) Yellow, and Black inks. Where’s White? It’s the paper color. So we use these four colors (plus the paper) to visually “mix” all the colors in a full color photo or graphic. CMYK is the shorthand for these four “process colors.” If we mix all the inks together you head darker and darker. Less ink coverage allows the “white” to show through from the paper. This is where we get light pastel tints.

Go back to your box of crayons; all the special colors–including silver, bronze, and that cool gold one–can be considered “spot colors.” These colors we create by premixing a particular supply of ink; green, pink, tan, brown, teal, adobe, maize, metallic, pastels, etc. If you absolutely positively have to have a certain color, you pick one of these “spot” colors from the Pantone color chips.

If you need certain chartreuse we can direct you to a Pantone color chip. These are good for printing one, two or even three colors. Once you get to four specific Pantone colors you want, you might want to get a quote on going with the cheaper, process equivalents (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black). If you have to have a particular color, not easily recreated with the process inks, and you need a full color photograph too, you might be heading into 5- and 6-color land. Be prepared for higher costs.

Check out ProjectCenter at www.makepapereasy.com or call us at 602-252-6655.

 

Some of the tips and tricks about the blue in printing:

-What’s A Blue line?

It’s a tool for proofing your printing project before going to press.

-Why is it blue?

The yellowish paper is photosensitive. When exposed to UV light, unprotected areas turn blue. In the olden days, proofs were made that produced images in brown. They were known as Van Dykes, as in Vany Dyke brown.

-How come my multi-color piece is just various shades of this blue color?

The various negatives that will be used to actually print your project are each exposed to the same piece of blue line paper, one at a time. The lighter inks that will be used get less exposure time, revealing a lighter blue.

-Why isn’t it the same as a color proof?

Color proofs can be made from the negatives, but they are far more expensive and time-consuming. Bluelines are cheaper and faster. The trend is actually going to imaging color proofs to the same matrix as the film or plate creation, but using toner and special paper. Running to an average deskjet or laserprinter isn’t as accurate.

-What should I look for on a blueline?

Bluelines were originally best for making sure the printer’s mechanicals included all the text and graphics you wanted. And to make sure all your photos were correctly scanned and placed into the right position.

Now, with desktop publishing and deskjet proofs provided by the client, bluelines are to make sure no fonts were left off (resulting in Courier instead of your desired typeface), to check that multi-page projects are correctly ordered, and that the job is correctly trimmed.

-What should I not be concerned with on a blueline?

Well, it’s the worst time to reconsider your content (unless you really want to repay for all new film and a new set of film).

It’s also not good for checking ink coverage, color separations, nor exact trapping. Bluelines aren’t extremely accurate for paper choice, since the paper used is in no way accurate to what stock will be used on the presses. The texture and thickness also has nothing to do with the final paper stock that will be used.

Check out ProjectCenter’s services at www.makepapereasy.com.

 

So many people want to set their sights on online printing. Reasonably, clients find the idea of online printing more efficient and easier. Why should a client have to talk to someone? Why not load up some artwork and press a “submit” button?

This experience sounds wonderful, but what happens when the client doesn’t send the files in the right format, or provides files that are inherently flawed? Depends on the printer, but some will just print what they receive and blame it on the provider (a.k.a. the client). Some will do the right thing, and work with the client.

Printers like the online world because it allows them to put the responsibility on the buyer. The problem here is that there is still such an incredible lack of  knowledge of the print world that it is ridiculous to put the blame on the buyer. As an example, there is still a vast amount pf people that believe that they can create artwork in any software and expect it to print with quality. This myth alone creates around 50% of the printing problems today.

Companies that care about their marketing should strongly consider having a graphic artist, print broker and/or tested printer to help them along with their projects, rather than settling for the online experience.

Check out ProjectCenter’s services at www.makepapereasy.com.

When printing a catalogue via a web printer, money can be saved when you print in slightly smaller sizes. To understand this concept, one needs to know the difference between web printing and other more common printing processes, such as sheet fed printing.

Sheet fed printers run large sheets of paper stock through a printer, and then the sheets are cut down to the sizes that were requested. Because the sheets are always the same size going into the printer, the cost is goods is the same everytime. Thus, size does not matter in terms of cost savings. Web printers stock their paper on very large rolls, which allows them to cut off the paper at any place they choose. This gives them the advantage of saving paper, resulting in a lower cost of goods. This savings is usually gets passed on to the client.

So, something as simple as printing a 8.25″ x 10.75″ catalogue, rather than a 8.5″ x 11″ catalogue can save a client quite a bit money when going through a web printer (a 1/4″ difference can amount to a 25% to 50% savings).

ProjectCenter is a single-source service company providing marketing and document solutions to small, medium and large-sized businesses in the U.S. area. ProjectCenter is based in Phoenix, Arizona and its services include graphic design, web design, printing, copying, scanning and mailing. For more information, please call (602) 252-6655 or visit  www.makepapereasy.com or follow us at www.twitter.com/ProjectCenter.

The history of printing goes back to some years, but it has developed very fast in recent years. Along with the advantage of new technology and easy printing, the most important thing is how much is understood about the client and their needs. There are some basic ways to understand clients. It doesn’t matter how beautifully or accurately something is written if the customer’s desire is not fulfilled. So the first thing is to listen to the client carefully. Half of the problems are solved just by listening, as the customer feels that someone cares about their problems. The next thing to do is to answer each and every query about products or services. If there is a suggestion box, they must be read because sometimes clients might suggest improving services.

 

There is one more thing that should be taken into account and that is keeping a watch on the work going on in the company. The working in the company should go on smoothly and the work ethics taken care of properly.  The employees should be easily approachable to the clients so that if there is any complaint about the service or work done, the staff should be easily available. If possible, provide a customer support service well informed and well equipped. The customer support should have an email address, a phone number and the website must have complete information regarding the products and services.

 

Printing is an age-old weapon for businessmen to leave their details with people so that their business spreads some more. This makes people are other firms aware of your business and the various services that you have to offer.

 

When it comes to printing postcards there are two types of printing, one is digital printing and the other is offset printing. Digital printing is quite popular among those who have low budget because prints are made directly from the computer and can only print CMYK images and the whole thing can be said to be of low quality. The only advantage of digital printing is that you can get the cards in very less time but a limited number of copies. If you need them in urgency and have run out of your cards you can easily have them with the help of digital printing.

 

In offset printing inked images are transferred from a plate to a rubber blanket and then to the printing surface. It brings out clear images and print outs but is affordable when the printing is to be done on large scale. Both printing methods are good enough to fulfill your purpose of propagating your business.

Check out ProjectCenter services at www.makepapereasy.com.

 

In the digital printing process, there is no bleed charge per side. Generally speaking, this is due to the fact that there isn’t as much manual labor involved with digital printing, as opposed to offset printing.

ABOUT PROJECTCENTER:

ProjectCenter is a single-source service company providing marketing and document solutions to small, medium and large-sized businesses in the U.S. area. ProjectCenter is based in Phoenix, Arizona and its services include graphic design, web design, printing, copying, scanning and mailing. For more information, please call (602) 252-6655 or visit  www.makepapereasy.com.