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Posts Tagged ‘ Illustrator ’

Objects created in vector programs such as Adobe Illustrator are made up of paths. Paths are mathematically calculated, and describe the relationship between two points. Straight paths are called lines while all other paths are called curves.

In order to create a point in Illustrator you simply choose the pen tool and click on the page. Click again in another location and you get a straight line. Click, hold down, and drag and you can create a curve. When you are creating a curve in illustrator you get what are called “handle bars“. These handle bars allow you to alter the direction and intensity of the curve.

Pen Tool A

Anatomy of a path:

1. Anchor Point

2. Control Points – you can control the bend of a curve by selecting these with your direct selection tool (white arrow) and moving them or their handle bars.

3. Handle Bars – show you the direction in which the curve is going. There are no handle bars on straight paths.

4. Paths – the lines that connect two points.

Types of Points & Lines:

1. Corner Point – they have only straight path segments connected to them.

2. Combination Points – have one straight path and one curved path connected to them.

3. Smooth Points – have two curved paths connected to them.

4. Straight Line

5. Curved Line


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STEP 1: Start with a basic circle. In Adobe  Illustrator, when using the circle shape tool you can hold down the shift key and get a perfect circle.

STEP 2: With the circle selected, copy it (Command C) and paste in front (command F) – this pastes the shape in the exact same place as the first one. If you select the top shape while holding the shift key, it allows you to move the shape exactly horizontal or vertical. In this case move the second circe horizontally so that it barely overlaps the first one.

STEP 3: using the rectangle tool and holding the shift key create a square.

STEP 4: Using the rotate tool and holding the shift key turn the square 45 degrees.

STEP 5: Move the rectangle and place it where the point of the heart will be. You may need to use the scale tool (holding the shift key) to resize it and place it accordingly.

STEP 6: Next use the direct selection tool (white arrow) and select that top point of the diamond. Move this point to inside the heart shape.

STEP 7: Select all of the shapes and using the pathfinder palette, choose the first button which adds shapes, and then choose expand to create the final shape.

ABOUT PROJECTCENTER:

ProjectCenter is a single-source service company providing marketing and document solutions to businesses nationally. ProjectCenter’s services include graphic design, web design, printing, copying, document scanning, etc. For more information, please visit these fine online establishments:

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Intro to compound paths and clipping masks in Illustrator.

It’s easy to put an image inside of text using Illustrator.

STEP 1: Start by designing your text. Turn it into outlines.

STEP 2: Import the image you would like to place inside the text. And arrange it to be behind the text in the position you’d like it to be in.

STEP 3: Select the words then go to the Object Menu —–> Compound Path —–> Make. The letters will become clear.

STEP 4: Select the words and the image then go to the Object Menu —> Clipping Mask —-> Make. This will set the image inside of the text.

NOTE: If you would like to put a different image in each letter of a word, instead of turning the words into a compound path you would simply ungroup the letters. Then, one at a time, you would place the image behind the letter, select them both and make the clipping mask until all are done.

ABOUT PROJECTCENTER:

ProjectCenter is a single-source service company providing marketing and document solutions to businesses nationally. ProjectCenter’s services include graphic design, web design, printing, copying, document scanning, etc. For more information, please visit these fine online establishments:

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Today’s post is geared towards some tutorial websites that I have seen lately. I hope this is helpful. Let me know.

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This website spans graphic design, web design & social media:

http://www.noupe.com/category/tutorial

Here is a rather well-known tutorial website that provides detailed steps:

http://psd.tutsplus.com/category/tutorials/

Some websites like this dedicate categories to Photoshop:

http://www.tutorial9.net/category/photoshop/

Here we have a website that believes it has the best Photoshop tutorials: 

http://bestphotoshoptutorials.net/category/tutorials/

This website is focused on web design:

http://www.thewebsqueeze.com/web-design-tutorials/

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ABOUT PROJECTCENTER:

ProjectCenter is a single-source service company providing marketing and document solutions to small, medium and large-sized businesses in the U.S. area. ProjectCenter is based in Phoenix, Arizona and its services include graphic design, web design, printing, copying, scanning and mailing. For more information, please call (602) 252-6655 or visit www.makepapereasy.com or follow us at http://twitter.com/ProjectCenter.

I had to write the blog just so that I could keep track of the information, and good information it is. Another blogger does the research for us. Check out http://loremipsumblvd.com/blog/2008/12/23-quality-free-stock-photography-sites/.

ABOUT PROJECTCENTER:

ProjectCenter is a single-source service company providing marketing and document solutions to small, medium and large-sized businesses in the U.S. area. ProjectCenter is based in Phoenix, Arizona and its services include graphic design, web design, printing, copying, scanning and mailing. For more information, please call (602) 252-6655 or visit  www.makepapereasy.com.

RGB is for viewing and CMYK is for printing.

Color Modes and When to Use Them:

Bitmap: 1-bit color. Pixels are either black or white. Good for simple line art with no shades of gray, no fuzzy edges. If you are saving to EPS format, remember to check for “Transparent Whites” if you want the black areas to be solid but the background to be “clear.” Be VERY careful messing with the Halftone Screens. If you want a cool T-shirt, silk screen effect, go for it, otherwise be prepared to see you work mangled beyond belief. To make this format more workable, you can convert it to Grayscale (then to duotone, or CMYK or RGB, etc.). If you have something in another format you have to convert it to Grayscale first, then Bitmap will become an option. Bitmaps are good for line art, doesn’t always need trapping, and can be colorized in programs like PageMaker into solid inks.

Grayscale: 8-bit color. Pixels can be black, white, or any one of 256 shades of gray. Good for black and white photos and illustrations. Full color images can easily be converted to grayscale for publication. (But if you want to see a full color–CMYK or RGB image as a grayscale, without actually converting it.

 

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Helvetica and Arial- two reasonably good san serif fonts that are often mistaken for one another. Here are a few hints to keeping them separate in your mind.

A little bit of history to begin with:

Helvetica was born in Switzerland in the 1950s. Created by the Haas Foundry, it was quickly adopted as the “new modern and clean” typeface of the corporate world.

More people have PCs than Macs and suddenly Arial is more popular than the “original” Helvetica.

Some other tips:

-The capital C in Helvetica has horizontal cusp ends. Arial’s are angled.

-The capital R in Helvetica has a curled leg. Arial has a straighter (though variable weight) leg.

-The lowercase t in Helvetica’s top is straight. Arial’s is trimmed at an angle.

-The number 1 in Helvetica has a flat underside to its “nose.” Arial is a simple stroke.

-The ampersand in Helvetica has a slightly taller end arm. Arial’s is a snip tighter.

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‘Print-ready’ refers to a graphic design file being formatted to a printer’s needs, so that the printer can make their adjustments in order to print the file appropriately. Although all printers have a pre-press department that can fine-tune files and batch up jobs to a printer, and broker/client must make sure certain actions are taken before it goes to a pre-press department.

The first action is to include “bleed” in the artwork (previously described in post http://projectcenter.wordpress.com/2007/11/01/what-is-full-bleed/), which is about 1/4″ of extra border on the background of the artwork, so that the printer can then print and cut down to size, resulting in a page where the color goes to the edge of the printed piece.

If a PDF is not being sent, but rather an EPS file, Illustrator file (AI), InDesign file (INDD) or PhotoShop file (PSD), then it is recommended that the artwork be outlined (Select > All, then Type > Create Outlines). Outlining is a function that embeds the fonts in the artwork, so that a receiver of the file does not need the incorporated fonts in order to open the file.

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As mention in a past posting (http://projectcenter.wordpress.com/2008/04/10/web-design-flash/), Flash is an animated component that is usually used as intro to a website, but can be implemented within web pages as well.

Keep in mind that entire websites can be created from the Flash software, but there are big issues with that approach. First, it means that your site will probably need more bandwidth over the internet for a viewer to load the website. Second, once the Flash website is created, it is cumbersome to make any changes at a later time. Third, if a client needs to change designers (i.e. the designer goes out of business or does not provide good customer service), the client needs to have and give access to the Flash source file. Without the source file, Flash needs to be recreated rather than revised, which increases the cost of the project.

As a suggestion, it might be a good idea to ask a prospective designer what softwares they will use to create a client website.

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If you are new to Design and the print industry, you may already know how frustrating it is to find the right software to keep up with the industry standards and know what each program is designed for since definitions tend to be very vague.

Adobe has long been the industry standard and become synonymous with print. While there are many programs available that offer similar features, sticking with Adobe products will ensure consistency with most print shops. That being said, knowing the differences between the programs and what they are designed for can save a lot of wasted time in preparing artwork. Below is a list of the 3 most commonly used Adobe programs as well as a brief description of each.

Adobe Illustrator:
Adobe Illustrator is a vector based program meaning it is designed to create line art graphics and drawings. It is great for creating logos, graphs, and intricate artwork with higher precision and execution than other programs. As long as the artwork was created in Illustrator (as opposed to being imported) it can be reduced/enlarged to any size without quality loss and the file will remain small. While it has some of the features that other programs have, it does not support them as well . For instance, it has effects and filters but they are much harder to manage and tend to make the file much larger than necessary. It also has type features but doesn’t support multiple pages so it is more complicated to create layouts.

Adobe Photoshop:
Adobe Photoshop is a raster based program. It is designed to apply effects and filters to existing artwork and photography. It is a very powerful program for creating realistic textures, artwork and effects and is equally as good for creating web graphics. Like Illustrator, it combines some of the features that the other programs have, but also like Illustrator, it does not support them as well. In order to achieve the quality and resolution of a vector image, the file could end up being 20x the size of a vector file, so it essential to know what the file will be used for before creating (ie; print or web). Once it has been created at a certain size, it cannot be enlarged without the quality suffering. It also does not support multiple page documents, simply because of the file size constraints.

Adobe InDesign:
Adobe InDesign is a desktop publishing program which basically compiles and links artwork, graphics and text into one file. It is designed to layout single and multiple page documents for print. It has a preflight feature which diagnoses any issues you might have before sending to a printer. It also has a collect for output feature which collect all linked artwork and photos along with the file itself and fonts used into one folder. It supports style sheets, rules, page numbering, etc. As with the others, it has several outside features but does not support them as well.

In a nutshell, each program has similar features to the other programs, but is individually designed with one core function that works in tandem with the other programs. If used to their full potential, they will compliment each other rather than compete.

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